Texas Vaccine Rollout Timeline

To date, Texas has opened up vaccine eligibility according to the following timeline

March 29,2021

Everyone 16 years old and older

March 15,2021

Phase 1C (people 50 to 60 years of age)

March 3,2021

Schools and licensed child are personnel

December 29,2020

Phase 1B (people 65+ with a health condition that increases risk of severe COVID - 19 ilness)

December 14,2020

Phase 1A (front-line healthcare workers and residents at long-term care facilities)



Texas continues to receive doses of the Pfizer, Moderna, and Johnson & Johnson COVID - 19 vaccines, and is distributing statewide to hospitals, pharmacies, local health departments, freestandings ERs, and other clinics.

Important to know

Two Doses

Moderna and Pfizer COVID - 19 vaccines both require two doses. It’s best if you get your second dose from the same brand as your first dose. For example, if you got a Moderna first dose, it’s best to get Moderna for your second dose.

The timing between your first and second dose depends on which vaccine you received:

  • Moderna: 4 to 6 weeks after your first dose
  • Pfrizer: 3 to 6 weeks after your first dose

Side Effects & Allergic Reactions

Mild side effects are normal signs your body is building protection, and they usually go away after a few days. Severe reactions fromv the vaccines are rare. To be safe, your provider will have you wait on-site for 15-30 mins after your shot. There’s no evidence that the vaccines cause long-term health problems.

Frequently Asked Questions

Different types of vaccines work in different ways to offer protection. But every type of vaccine works by teaching our bodies how to make cells that trigger an immune response. That immune response, which produces antibodies, is what protects us from getting infected if the real virus enters our bodies.

Currently, there are three main types of COVID-19 vaccines that are or soon will be undergoing large-scale (Phase 3) clinical trials in the United States:

  • mRNA vaccines
  • Protein subunit vaccines
  • Vector vaccines

 

COVID-19 vaccines do not use the live virus and cannot give you COVID-19. The vaccine does not alter your DNA. COVID-19 vaccination will help protect you by creating an immune response without having to experience sickness.

Learn more about how COVID-19 vaccines work on the Understanding How COVID-19 Vaccines Work section of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) website.

Getting this vaccine once it is available to you represents one step that you can take to get the Texas economy, and our day-to-day lives, back to normal.

Safety is a top priority while federal partners work to make COVID-19 vaccines available. The new COVID-19 vaccines have been evaluated in tens of thousands of volunteers during clinical trials. The vaccines are only authorized for use if they are found to be safe.

Even though they found no safety issues during the clinical trials, CDC and other federal partners will continue to monitor the new vaccines. They watch out for serious side effects (or “adverse events”) using vaccine safety monitoring systems, like the new V-safe After Vaccination Health Checker app.

For the most up-to-date information, see the Vaccine Safety section of the CDC website.

To learn about CDC’s new vaccine safety monitoring system, see the V-safe After Vaccination Health Checker section of the CDC website.

Yes. Immunity from the COVID-19 vaccine may last longer than the natural immunity you get if you’ve already had COVID-19.

People who currently have COVID-19 should not be vaccinated while being sick.

All but one of the COVID-19 vaccines currently in development need two shots to be effective. You need two doses from the same manufacturer, spaced 21 or 28 days apart. You will get full protection from the vaccine usually 1–2 weeks after getting your second dose.

At this time, experts do not know how long protection will last or whether a booster shot will be necessary later, after the initial recommended vaccine dose(s). CDC and DSHS will keep the public informed as they learn more.

For all but one of the COVID-19 vaccines currently in development, you will need two shots for full protection. You will need two doses from the same manufacturer, spaced 21 or 28 days apart, depending on the vaccine manufacturer. You will get full protection from the vaccine usually 1–2 weeks after getting your second dose. Get the second shot even if you have side effects from the first shot, unless the vaccination provider or your healthcare provider tells you not to get the shot.

When you get the vaccine, you will receive information about what kind of vaccine you got and when you need to come back for your second dose. You can register and use the new V-safe After Vaccination Health Checker to receive health check-ins after you receive a COVID-19 vaccination, as well as reminders to get your second dose if you need one.

If you choose to get only one dose, the amount of protection you may have is not known

No, you do not have to start all over. Missing the suggested interval delays full protection. But you can still get the second dose later if you have difficulty getting it within the recommended time. Just don’t get it earlier than recommended.

According to CDC, if you need help scheduling your vaccine appointment for your second shot, contact the location that set up your appointment for assistance. Both COVID-19 mRNA vaccines will need two shots to get the most protection.

The timing between your first and second shot depends on which vaccine you received. You should get your second shot:

  • for the Pfizer-BioNTechvaccine: 3 weeks (or 21 days) after your first shot;
  • for the Modernavaccine: 1 month (or 28 days) after your first shot.

 

You should get your second shot as close to the recommended 3-week or 1-month interval as possible. However, there is no maximum interval between the first and second doses for either vaccine. You should not get the second dose earlier than the recommended interval.

For more information, visit the What to Expect after Getting a COVID‑19 Vaccine section of the CDC website.

 

For information about the Pfizer vaccine, visit the Information about the Pfizer-BioNtech COVID-19 Vaccine section of the CDC website.

 

For information about the Moderna vaccine, visit the Information about the Moderna COVID-19 Vaccine section of the CDC website.

 

For information about the Johnson & Johnson vaccine, visit the Information about the Johnson & Johnson Jansssen COVID-19 Vaccine section of the CDC website.

For the two-dose vaccines, the process of getting fully vaccinated takes over a month in total. You will get full protection from the vaccine usually 1–2 weeks after getting your second dose.

Talk to a healthcare provider to get information specific to your COVID-19 vaccine.

Talk to your healthcare provider about the timing of your vaccination(s) if you have been sick with COVID-19.

COVID-19 vaccines are associated with a number of side effects, but almost all of them are mild. They include pain and redness at the injection site, fatigue, headache, body aches and even fever.

Having symptoms like fever after you get a vaccine is normal and a sign your immune system is building protection against the virus. The side effects from COVID-19 vaccination may feel like flu, but they should go away in a few days.

If you get the vaccine and experience severe side effects or ones that do not go away in a couple of days, contact your healthcare provider for further instructions on how to take care of yourself.

COVID-19 vaccines are new and are still being evaluated. Some COVID-19 vaccines may prevent severe illness, while others may prevent people from getting COVID-19 altogether. Others may be effective to prevent spreading COVID-19. CDC and DSHS will keep the public informed as they learn more.

Different vaccines are proving to have different efficacy rates. Some manufacturers are reporting 90% to 95% protection at 1–2 weeks after receiving the final dose. At this time, experts do not know how long protection will last or whether a booster shot will be necessary later, after the initial recommended vaccine dose(s). CDC and DSHS will keep the public informed as they learn more.

Yes. Experts are still learning about the protection that COVID-19 vaccines provide under real-life conditions. The vaccine is not expected to be 100% effective. At this time, CDC recommends that everyone continue to use all the tools to protect ourselves and others from getting and spreading the virus. Wear a mask or cloth face covering whenever you are out in public or when around people who don’t live in your household. These masks or face coverings help when you can’t avoid being in the same space as others.

Wearing a mask or cloth face covering does not mean you don’t need to stay a safe distance from others. Social distancing, or staying at least 6 feet apart from others, is still necessary to keep you and others safe.

Experts at CDC are learning about the protection that COVID-19 vaccines provide under real-life conditions. So, once you get vaccinated, keep wearing your mask, washing your hands and staying six feet from others until you hear differently from CDC and DSHS.

 Three excellent sources of reliable information are the Texas Department of State Health Services (DSHS), Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), and the Food and Drug Administration (FDA).

DSHS

COVID-19 Vaccine Information

 

CDC

COVID-19 Vaccines

COVID-19 Vaccine Safety

8 Things to Know about the U.S. COVID-19 Vaccination Program

What to Expect after Getting a COVID-19 Vaccine

V-safe After Vaccination Health Checker

 

FDA

COVID-19 Vaccines

FDA Homepage